The doc From Back to the Future

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With maturity, rappers gain perspective and the understanding that real success comes from making an impact on people’s lives. This can be done by becoming a voice for your community, whether it comes from hip-hop or otherwise. A legacy comes from a journey, and a journey comes from a legacy. As Tracy “The D.O.C.” (the doc) Curry embarked on his hip-hop journey in 1987, armed with a razor-sharp pen and cadence that struck like Mike Tyson’s punches, he wanted to make a name for himself. As he achieved most of his goals, a curveball was thrown at him.

His life might seem tragic to those who know him only from the N.W.A biopic Straight Outta Compton (which featured a magnificent performance by Marlon Yates Jr.). In 1989, he released No One Can Do It Better, a record that established him as a star on the mic. He was instrumental in writing one of hip-hop’s most revered albums (N.W.A’s Straight Outta Compton). He nearly died in a car accident that damaged his vocal cords before his debut album achieved success. (the doc)

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Despite the more literal interpretations of the proverb nowadays, when many people feel like their 15 minutes of fame are fleeting, resilience remains a virtue that the modern-day proverb disregards. Despite a rocky start in his music career, the talented rapper was determined to keep going back then.
Dre helped D.O.C. (the doc) craft the sound of his first album as a mentor and N.W.A producer/rapper. To this day, they still collaborate. Nevertheless, as Dre and his protege, Snoop Doggy Dogg, built Death Row into a dynasty in the mid to early 1990s, “Mind Blowing” was going through a dark period. Seeing that his voice would likely never be the same led him to turn to drugs and alcohol.(the doc)

D.O.C. (the doc) overcomes his negative thoughts through struggles and personal relationships and redefines where he wants to serve in the world. In the city’s youth, the violence in recent years has plagued youth, and the Dallas native, now 51 years old, began working with civil rights leader Peter Johnson to promote anti-violence among the city’s emcees. Now, “It’s Funky Enough” rapper’s life is a triumphant one rather than a tragedy.(the doc)

During the 2020 Producers & Engineers Wing Grammy Week in Los Angeles, D.O.C. visited his mentor Dr. Dre, who was presented with a Lifetime Achievement Award by The Recording Academy. The venerable rhymer told VIBE a variety of things about his new philanthropic endeavors and the unique influence Public Enemy had on Straight Outta Compton. Kendrick Lamar’s music wouldn’t be affected by advice from MC Breed and why he wouldn’t give any music advice to Kendrick. One thing that won’t change over the last 30 years is the D.O.C. ‘s (the doc) formula for success: No one does it better.

After I was injured, I found it difficult to clear my head. I am naturally drawn to shamanism. Those 30 years have been meant for me to heal myself, and now I am free. I don’t have the need to be the greatest of all time since I’m only a speck of the highest energy that has ever existed. My present-day self is infinitely more important than my 30-year-old self, but the way I got here over the past thirty years is equally important.

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I last knew about you as a musician when you assisted with the production of the Straight Outta Compton soundtrack, a film and album that you helped to release with Dr. Dre. When was the last time you worked?

One of the men I met last year was Peter Johnson, a nonviolent movement member of Martin Luther King Jr. In the years following the assassination of Dr. King, Peter moved to Dallas and began to fight for civil rights. Among his ideas was the food stamp. Rosa Parks, Thurgood Marshall, and so many other icons from my past are all woven into his stories. This guy talks about all these historical figures like I talk about Dr. Dre. Therefore, I began to work with him. Dallas murder rates are escalating rapidly, he told me. Let’s stop this killing between these kids if you can.”(the doc)

So you said yes?

You say yes when Peter Johnson tells you to help him. Let’s arrange several free concerts, I suggested. Dallas’ hottest artists play twice a year for high schoolers that are trying hard and for the ones that have fallen through the cracks. It is important to present them with the possibility of finding individuals willing to help rid the streets of violence. I kept saying, “We gotta do this,” and they replied, “Unc, we’re with you 100%.” That gave me their support to do some stuff that can help hip-hop artists and the youth.

It’s been a good year for Yella Beezy.

Yella Beezy told me he was going to be the sh*t in this little studio, and I was hearing the same thing from everyone else. He signed with Hitco six months later, and his record was hot. L.A. opened that way. As a community, Dallas was opened by the gift Reid gave to Beezy. In these harsh times, the machine is really looking at these kids, so I take it upon myself to make sure that those who don’t have a light on them can get some shine and get back into the fold of making music and albums that will last. In order to be successful, you need to be long-lived. In ten years, where do you see yourself? You won’t be doing anything if you don’t think about that now.(the doc)

The media sometimes blames rappers’ content for violence. Does that affect your decision on working with them?

The guys who spread the negative stereotypes are constantly doing good for the kids. They give backpacks to children and turkeys to families, which shows they are decent people, but they are overlooked. My point is explained in the following way.

Is there any musician you would like to collaborate with?

No [rapping, I’m working on creating] a series of albums with young artists. It will be my first time in Dallas. Four talented artists that have the potential to become great will be part of my lineup. Provide each artist with three songs and create something cohesive. It’s not for profit. During a series of these, I could travel to at least two different cities twice a year.

The only thing I would say to Kendrick (Lamar) is “you’re dope.”

AT @WESTCOASTDOC

What inspired you to become a philanthropist?(the doc)

Absolutely. My connection with the building owner in Dallas’ southern center came from that perspective. I began to envision a tech company donating computers to build a studio inside. The building has another end that could be converted into a trade school. Giving an opportunity to these kids to make their own way forward is my way of giving back. At the moment, I’m focused on that. That came out of me because of Peter Johnson. As a father of two young boys, I would like them to know that their dad was a lot more than rapping about formulas, girls, and boys.(the doc)

I’m returning to the album Compton. There were some gems in Kendrick Lamar’s mixtape. Are you familiar with his work?(the doc)

Kendrick has my full respect ever since I (the doc) was a kid, which is why I would never ever say anything else than “you’re dope” to him. As he worked on Compton and wrote, there was nobody else in the room except him. As I was sitting next to him, I went over and sat with him. There was nothing to say or do to each other, so there was nothing to say to each other. The only thing I did was sit next to him. As soon as he’d laid his sh*t, I told him how appreciated he was. He left after that. A few months later he included my name in Taylor Swift’s single (“Bad Blood”). As soon as I heard that, I accompanied this kid on an adventure. Being recognized like that is so humbling because it shows you meant something to someone.

Do you feel the same way about any other artists right now?(the doc)

Joyner Lucas’ wordplay is equally exquisite, in my opinion. His voice reminds me of an Em'[inem] teen. That kind of wordplay appeals to me. During Em’s first comeback, his songs were nutty, just like when he was first introduced. The two of them. When it comes to rap music, Dot is probably my favorite group.

"the

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DOC back to the future/ back to the future doc/ doc brown back to the future

27 years after the release of Back to the Future Part III, it’s time to return to the past and find out what happened behind the scenes.

Screenwriter Bob Gale and artist John Barber reunite to co-create a new story as a sequel to Back to the Future: Tales from the Time Train, a new comic book series from IDW Publishing. During the final scene of the movie, fans were probably wondering what had happened to Doc, Clara, and their kids. When they arrived in the future, what happened?

Doctor Doc (Christopher Lloyd) and his children arrive in the present on a time-traveling train. Afterwards, Marty (Michael J. Fox) asks Doc whether they’re going back in time. In response, the scientist replies, “Nope, I’ve already been there,” ending the series.

With the writers, Heat Vision has discussed continuing the beloved series (and moving forward in time) as a comic book series.

It has been a few years since the IDW Back to the Future series aired, but this marks the first time you have addressed Doc’s unresolved plot line at the end of Part III. Was this always your intent?

IDW originally pitched me that we would do a new adventure with Marty and his kids, and I refused to do it. Through our video game, Back to the Future, published with Telltale in 2010, we explored the popularity of Marty McFly and Doc Brown. Since people have written in asking questions about the movies for years, I responded, “if we do this” – initially, it was only to be a four-issue series. Marty met Doc Brown in what way? The fire that destroyed Doc Brown’s house was caused by what? Fans might enjoy those stories, and I thought they’d be interesting.

IDW was also determined not to mess up the Back to the Future mythology – and I was, too. “Let’s see how it goes.” By the third issue, they said, “It’s selling well, so we’ll do five issues.” Then later, they said, “We’ll make it into a continuing series.” Once they said that, I got with John Barber, who’d been the head writer on the first four, and we started kicking ideas around asking, how do we explore new adventures? At that point, IDW announced, “We won’t be doing little shorts now; we’re going to do longer arcs.” This led to some interesting concepts. I would make sure things kept on track when John came up with a great idea.

The doc accident

A horrific car crash left Curry’s voice box and larynx crushed six months after the release of his solo album, virtually muting his voice. Curry’s unwavering spirit kept him in the game, appearing on Dr. Dre’s iconic The Chronic album with his unmistakable overtly raspy tone.

In an exclusive two-part interview on The David Banner Podcast, D.O.C. unveils some of the intimate happenings inside of the N.W.A. camp, but some never before heard details about the car accident that almost took his life.

doc ock into the spider verse

Like everything else in Phil Lord and Chris Miller’s “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse,” the decision to change Doc Ock to Olivia Octavius turned the animated adventure upside down. When Sony Animation cast Kathryn Hahn (“Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation”) as her voice, director Bob Persichetti realized that the gender-swapped character would make an unparalleled villain.


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